Three Reasons Why Game of Thrones is Overrated

Game of Thrones is Overrated

Game of Thrones is Overrated

Everyone’s jumped on the Game of Thrones bandwagon these days. It’s a geek’s dream come true because we finally have a serious attempt at transforming a well known fantasy series into a watchable TV show. Most shows end up doing a horrible job like the terrible “Legend of the Seeker” based on the Sword of Truth books. This is a trend. TV shows usually end up mauling the source material. So when geeks see a classy production closely following the Song of Ice and Fire book series, they go overboard praising it. And they’re right to do so. HBO makes awesome shows and it’s clear they’ve done Game of Thrones with a lot of love and respect for the source material.

Unfortunately none of that can make up for the shortcomings of the series itself. Warning: I’m not shy of giving away lots of spoilers, so read this at your own risk and peril. So here’s why the entire story line of Game of Thrones (Song of Ice and Fire) sucks hard.

Good Guys ALWAYS Lose

I keep hearing how this series is a “breath of fresh air” where Martin isn’t afraid to kill off his main characters and that in “real life”, the good guys don’t always win etc etc. This is true. In real life, the bad guys win some and the good guys win some. Except that in Martin’s world, the good guys never win. Character after character bites the dust without gaining a victory. Ned, Robb, Catelyn, Bran…they all get shitty deals. All of them without exception betrayed. Even our darling Arya gets royally screwed.

And the baddies? While some shit happens to them, they’re essentially self goals. Joffrey gets his comeuppance not at the hands of any hero, but from within his own side. Cersei self destructs. Tywin gets it in the gut from his own son. In other words, revenge is tragically missing from the entire Game of Thrones series. All the good guys (and wolves too!) die horrible and humiliating deaths and the bad guys essentially slip down some stairs and break their neck. Like I said in “real life”, both goodies and baddies will have victories. But Martin is just a sadist.

I get the feeling that whenever Martin feels like his plot is losing its way or is in danger of being resolved, he just sits down and thinks “Hmm..this can’t happen. Let’s kill someone!” In other words, he uses the death of his characters as a substitute for plot development and for sheer shock value hoping that others will laud him for being “gritty” and “real”.

No New Engaging Characters

I wouldn’t mind Martin polishing off his characters if he comes up with new ones at the same rate with which they exit the stage. But he doesn’t. Instead, he gives us lame creatures like Davos who no one really cares for. And then he kills him too! So who the hell is left? Brienne?

So while the initial books were riveting for the sole reason that tragedy and betrayal abound, Martin pays the price for his carelessness by not having a plot to carry the story forward. No wonder he took five years to come out with “Dance with Dragons” and openly admitted that he was working on other stuff in the meantime. He didn’t know what to do with the story! He’d killed off or crippled every single person of interest to us on Westeros so what more was left?

Moral of the story: Don’t be so casual with your main characters. We were emotionally invested in them and you chose a single big payoff by disposing of them at the cost of future story lines. Congratulations. You now have colorless remains. I haven’t even bothered to pick up Dance with Dragons because I saw nothing in the previous book to interest me further. My wife started reading it, and gave up halfway. Too boring. Did anyone expect differently? When your main characters are missing it’s like trying to squeeze water out of a rock.

It’s not Real Fantasy

At the most, we can say that the series has a passing acquaintance with magic elements. A couple of dragon scenes and veiled references to “walkers” do not a fantasy make. I initially picked this up because I was told it was one of the best fantasy writings ever. The truth however is that it’s basically fictional history. The fantasy elements are kept down to a minimum or are even non existent. I felt pretty cheated.

So much potential. All wasted by lazy storytelling. The solution to the current hysteria is to have more good fantasy novels converted into TV series with the same attention to detail and production quality that HBO is showing the with Song of Ice and Fire series. Only then will we get a sense of perspective and finally stop mooning over Game of Thrones simply because it’s all we have to look forward to at the moment.

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Comments

  1. Andy. Just Andy says:

    Found myself skipping the boring stuff more and more. Like, in the middle of a grand siege of a castle we also have to sit through 2×5 minutes of emotion talking between 2 women? Not interested. Did I miss anything? Probably. Don’t care.

  2. pam says:

    Have just finished watching season 3 (on DVD) have come to conclusion Game of Thrones, is not a fantasy story at all. Instead it is horror soap opera – full of brutal violence over and over, and with a soapy story line, no constructive story line; thus serves no purpose other than to repeatedly show horror violence. Which is a shame because it has great actors, great direction, great camera work etc. I guess in near future someone will be able to make a good send up of it.

  3. LL says:

    I like Davos, dagnabit!

  4. I haven’t read the books but I am a avid fan of the show. It does get boring at times. There’s times I even pause the show and put on SOA to give me some excitement lol. Anyways I’ve put together a collage of different game of thrones t shirts at http://gameofthroneswiki.info/30-epic-game-thrones-t-shirts-havent-seen-yet/ I even found a ice bucket challenge version, is epic. Click it out!

  5. MoLoLu says:

    I watched Series 1-3 (finally) and, while I found it entertaining, it was a little too scattered. Part of the issue I believe is this: too many scenes with just 2 characters in them. Fine in a book. Not so fine in a TV series where the dialogue isn’t as important as things happening. Being an author myself, I can see why Martin put those scenes in. But the content of many discussions could’ve been ported to the TV a bit better; or fitted into other scenes.

    Another part of the issue in my eyes: lack of character development. Three seasons in, and the characters stick firmly to their archetype. This is realistic if you think about it – most people don’t change very fast. The problem was it got to the point where I could reliably predict who would act how and do what to the extent there wasn’t any mystery left. It didn’t help that everyone kept dying either.

    Oddly, GOT kinda reminded me of HBO’s Rome in many ways. Only I liked Rome’s pacing and characters a lot better. Now that’s not to say GOT is universally a bad show. And the books might be great for all I know. I don’t know as I can’t be bothered to read them anymore. What I can say though is that, for my taste, the series wasn’t quite entertaining enough to keep me going – or interested past Season 3, which I lost interest in halfway through.

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